Raniere at it again: Bronfman sisters sue Canaprobe after spending $1.1 million spying on enemies!

  • From January 18 2016 English translation of 
  • La Presse of Montreal Story :Two Bronfman sisters pursue a Montreal firm survey

Two heirs of a wealthy Montreal family, and members of a “sect”, a million in private investigation fees, an ex-policeman who invented offshore bank accounts and mysterious financial threats …

Clare Bronfman... (Photo tirée de Facebook) - image 1.0

Clare Bronfman

PHOTO FROM FACEBOOK

Sara Bronfman... (Photo tirée de Facebook) - image 1.1

Sara Bronfman

PHOTO FROM FACEBOOK

All the elements of a good spy novel find themselves in a lawsuit by two sisters Bronfman clan against Canaprobe, a firm of Montreal survey they had charged with shedding light on the threats to their financial interests.

Clare and Sara Bronfman paid him the equivalent of $ 1.1 million between 2008 and 2011 but now complain of the quality of the reports of the investigative firm.

La Presse recently studied the record of proceedings, which is still before the Superior Court.

Richard Marier, the owner of Canaprobe says being itself a victim of crooked contractors. He had entrusted a part of investigative work to a former Ontario police officer and his wife.

Some years later, however, the same couple was found guilty of having created from scratch, repeatedly, account statements proving the existence of millions hidden abroad. The information provided to Bronfman would also flawed.

The Bronfman sisters make its own way in the family clan, became billionaires through the former giant Seagram spirits. They are the cousins ​​of Stephen Bronfman, the best known member of the family to Montreal, which also tries to bring back major league baseball.

According to the latest information available, both are active within NXIVM – pronounced NEXIUM – a qualified organization “cult” by their father Edgar Bronfman Sr., died in 2013. The group has more as a growth seminar organizer personal for top executives, an activity that is “change needed by humanity to change the course of history,” according to what we read on the website of the organization.

In late 2010, Vanity Fair magazine revealed that Clare and Sara Bronfman had injected “up to 150 million US” in the organization and were mixed in a legal war against dissidents.However, it was not possible to determine whether the mandate given to Canaprobe is related to these lawsuits.

Information “incorrect and unreliable”

In 2008, the two sisters are taken to “concerns about the possibility that people” can “cause significant harm to their interests,” they tell five years later in the prosecution file. They therefore ask Canaprobe, based in Montreal, “investigate individuals and get financial documents.”

Impossible to know the precise targets of the investigation. Everywhere, in court documents consulted by La Presse, although care is taken to avoid the merits of the case.

The firm says Canaprobe investigation subcontracted part of its mandate to Cullen Johnson and Elaine White, a couple of private detectives accustomed to Ontario for financial investigations.

What Canaprobe however unaware at the time, is that bloodhounds were imaginative: they had made a specialty of forging bank statements which attributed falsely million individuals covered by their investigations. An Ontario divorce process has thus been allocated in the Cayman million, to the chagrin of his ex-wife, and a participant in a group buying lottery tickets has been accused – “proof” to support – of hiding the loot in Barbados and Switzerland.

In spring 2011, the two sisters are Bronfman in US courts in a civil case involving one of the people on which Canaprobe investigated. They want to use a report. The firm is opposed, arguing that these were documents to be used only for informational purposes.

Two years later the Montreal detectives admit in a letter appearing in court record that information obtained from Johnson and White “proved incorrect and unreliable.” “Canaprobe is a victim of White and Johnson, like many others,” it added.

The company claims to have informed the Bronfman in 2009 of accuracy problems in the reports produced by the Ontario couple. The two sisters deny this assertion.

The Superior Court will decide in the coming months.

The Bronfman sisters and their lawyer Christine Provencher did not want to talk with La Presse. “We have no comment on the case right now,” said Fasken Martineau email, their law firm.

They demand the repayment of 1.1 million paid over $ 50,000 in damages.

Richard Marier, head of Canaprobe, did not want to expand on the issue. “The action continues in the court and will be vigorously defended,” he has just said by telephone.

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