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Shira’s Got the Scoop channels outrage over ‘kiss-ass’ NY Times Magazine story on NXIVM

Shira’s Got the Scoop had a take on the New York Times Magazine article published yesterday that mirrors what a lot of insiders are saying:

As usual, her work is entertaining and insightful, She begins:

Those who know a ton about NXIVM are outraged by yesterday’s New York Times Magazine piece.  Writer Vanessa Grigoriadis went “inside NXIVM” as much as she possibly could – meaning, as much as the group, which had banned media for 14 years prior to her arrival, would allow.

Her access seemed to have been greatly controlled, and the people she met with (including Nancy Salzman, Clare Bronfman, Keith Raniere and Allison Mack) used carefully crafted language that reflected intense media training.

Read the rest of the story from Shira:

#NXIVM: That “Kiss-Ass” New York Times Magazine Piece





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  • It appears that for whatever reason(s) Vanessa choose to write her story from the prospective she did, she got something other than factual reporting out of it.

    She was given access based on what the top ranking mind-benders wanted her to know and they were very well prepared for their NXIVM Tea Party which included tool-aid which shedding enough of to see this coco puffs in the light she reported.

    After talking with some ExNx’s Vanessa talked with to get the REST of the story, she left a great deal of important information on the editing floor in order to shine a false picture of ExNxers that fit into her kool-aid influenced stupor.

    The saddest thing is it could of been a well-written article give both perspectives. To date other than this article, NXIVM has refused to return any requests for comment to any other reporter.

    It only goes to show money can by you some PR but most know the Real Truth. No one in NXIVM does anything without Ranieres Go Ahead and it has to be his idea.

  • Having a sex trafficking ring run by well to do white women makes it marginally harder for prosecutors to explain what NXIVM is all about.
    The ED NY must indict Raniere and Mack for conspiracy to commit blackmail to drive home the point to jurors that the both of them are ruthless deviant criminals.

    • Here is how Keith Raniere and Allison Mack must be prosecuted.

      Use of Interstate Wires to Commit Extortion.
      I. Generally Title 18 of the United State Code contains several federal crimes of extortion, communicating threats, and similar federal offenses, whether the communication is via “wire” or mail. Sections 871 through 880 of Title 18, U.S. Code, list these federal crimes: §871. Threats Against the President §872. Extortion by U.S. Officers or Employees §873. Blackmail §874. Kickbacks from Public Works Employees §875. Interstate Communications §876. Mailing Threatening Communications §877. Mailing Threats from Foreign Country §878. Threats Against Foreign Officials §879. Threats Against Former Presidents §880. Receiving Proceeds of Extortion

      Generally, the crime of “blackmail” has become more known as “extortion.” Extortion is essentially threatening to do something, or disclose something, that will in some manner harm the potential victim of the threat. Often, the threat of the potential harm is done in attempts to obtain something of value, whether it is money or some non-­‐tangible benefit. It is a federal crime pursuant to the use of interstate or foreign communications (see Title 18, U.S. Code, §875, Interstate Communications), or the use of the mail (see Title 18, U.S. Code §876, Mailing Threatening Communications). A federal threat crime can also be prosecuted pursuant to the requirement that it involve a violation of federal law (see Title 18, U.S. Code, §873, Blackmail).

      The most common extortion or extortionate threat prosecuted by a United States Attorney’s Office or by the U.S. Department of Justice is for Interstate Communications, which involves threats of harm (can be physical, economic, or other) that are carried out by the use of wire transmissions, such as emails, faxes, computer chats or messages, wires, or other interstate or foreign communications. Mailing threatening communications would have been considered a common method of communicating threats that violate federal criminal law several years ago, but with technological advances with computers and communications, more such threats are commonly communicated by an interstate transmission than by using the mail system.

      The threat has to be an actual threat, and the potential or threatened harm can be economic, but it does not have to be so. A threatened harm can be to reputation or to any information that would negatively affect a person or his/her business.

      https://teakelllaw.com/extortion-and-federal-threat-crimes/

      • Mack and Raniere used Dropbox and the internet to collect and transmit salacious photos and videos to use against their victims.

    • Yes, they could probably do that.

      But they don’t need to since the blackmail element is already present in the sexual charges against him…..since those charges are predicated on the “coercion” element which represents the ‘blackmail collateral’.

      His sex with the women is already admitted…..so the blackmail material (collateral) will prove that he coerced them into sex on a systematic basis. They don’t need to charge him separately for “extortion” because if the jury believes he blackmailed these gals, he’ll be convicted of a far worse crime.

  • Shira, thank you for providing the rebuttal. Shame on NYT Mag for publishing the Vanessa Grigoriadis’ piece without any cross checking. I am still sickened that the article appears to gloss over all that we have learned here. KR is presented almost as a martyr, which is precisely what he desires. KR: May you get old, ugly, fat and powerless in prison. I hope you will never be freed. Don’t worry, a lot of bologna is coming your way.

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